There are many fine educational videos about elephants. I’d like to share a couple videos that highlight how incredibly emotional elephants can be. In some ways they seem even more emotional than us.

Correction: I mistakenly read the videographer’s comment as identifying the young elephant. In fact, the elephant is not identified by name. But it appears to be a bit younger than 2 years old.
The first video shows an orphan elephant at the Nairobi Nursery (David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust). In the video, she adores the attention and physical contact with her human visitors and just cannot get enough (growing more mischievous in the process).

This is the 2nd of a 2-part video about a retired circus elephant, Shirley. At the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, Shirley must say bye to her former zoo keeper of over 20 years. But she has a surprise reunion with an elephant which is quite tender.

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E is for Ear

E is for Ear

E is for Ear

E is for Ear

E is for Ear

E is for Ear

E is for Ear

An elephant has an excellent sense of hearing, using its ears, trunk, and feet. Elephants can sense other elephants from several kilometers away through vibrations in the ground. Stomping their feet is one type of communication. Elephants will also trumpet and growl as in a greeting or warning.

Frequently fanning their ears helps an elephant cool down. Since the elephant has a large skin surface area to volume ratio, it is difficult to release body heat. The cool air produced by fanning also cools the many blood vessels close to the ears’ surface. This blood then circulates to help the elephant body cool to 10 degrees less. Skin on an elephant ear is thinner than most parts of its body.